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Universal Credit

Universal Credit is a payment to help with your living costs, you may be able to get it if you’re on a low income, out of work or you cannot work.

Universal Credit is replacing certain benefits, please check Gov.uk to view the full list effected. 

If you get tax credits, they will stop when you or your partner applies for Universal Credit.

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Each year all benefits are subject to uprating in April, this means the amounts paid are increased.  Please check Gov.uk

Your Universal Credit payment is made up of a standard allowance and any extra amounts that apply to you, for example if you:

  • have children
  • have a disability or health condition which prevents you from working
  • need help paying your rent

Use a benefits calculator to see how much you could get, how much UC you get will depend on your earnings.

Additionally you may get more money on top of your standard allowance if you’re eligible, the criteria is available on Gov.uk

Your circumstances are assessed every month. Changes in your circumstances can affect how much you’re paid for the whole assessment period - not just from the date you report them.

With any award of Benefit you must report any changes of your circumstances as soon as they change.

Universal Credit is paid once a month, usually into your bank, building society or credit union account.

Apply for Universal Credit online.

You have to apply as a couple if you and your partner live together. You do not need to be married.

The Universal Credit team might phone you after you’ve sent your application if they need more information or if you cannot verify your identity online.

You cannot claim Universal Credit and tax credits at the same time. If you get tax credits, they will stop when you or your partner applies for Universal Credit.

Last updated: 11/08/2020